SFA: Suicide First Aid: Understanding Suicide Intervention

SFAUSI Bold logo

12 November 2019

Fully Booked

1-day training solution teaching suicide intervention skills.  The course is also a qualification programme awarded by City & Guilds Institute. Upon satisfactory completion of a knowledge-based written assessment participants attain 6 NQF credits at level 4.

The National Qualification in Suicide Prevention 2013-19

Course overview:

Teaching the theory and practice of suicide intervention skills that can be applied in any professional or personal setting, captured in a one-day event accredited by City and Guilds of London. We use only the most experienced suicide prevention trainers to deliver this unique learning experience: for anyone who seeks greater understanding and confidence to intervene with people at risk of suicide.

Course content:

SFAUSI is comprised of 4 parts, each approximately 90 minutes duration. The programme teaches and practices the skills and knowledge needed to identify someone who may be thinking about suicide and competently intervene to help create suicide-safety as a first aid approach.

Part 1 – 09:30 to 11:00

  • Introduction to: the day; programme; ourselves and suicide prevention
  • Stigma, Survivors of bereavement by suicide and the Hidden Toll
  • Suicide thoughts and suicide behaviour
  • Intention of behaviour Versus Outcome of behaviour
  • Possible Causes of Suicide thoughts

Part 2 – 11:15 to 12:45

  • Suicide – the Ripple Effect
  • Population-based approach to suicide prevention
  • Partnership working
  • Working with attitudes and values
  • “I’m Really Glad You Told Me” audio visual

Part 3 – 13:30 to 14:45

  • Meeting the needs of a person who is thinking about suicide
  • Suicide-Safety Guide
  • Step 1 – Recognising suicide and Asking about suicide
  • Step 2 – Understanding options

Part 4 – 15:00 to 16:30

  • Step 3 – Safeguarding suicide
  • Suicide-safety and self-care
  • The risk assessment approach
  • Future learning

Methods of delivery:

Taught over 6 hours using tutor facilitated Socratic learning, tutor-led role-play, mini lectures, group work and audiovisual presentations. This is a highly interactive and emotionally engaging learning experience.

Pre-training requirement:

No previous experience or training is necessary. Participants will be asked to self- reflect and empathise with a person having thoughts of suicide.

Who should attend?

Multi-sector practitioners including health, housing, social care, education, criminal justice, call centre operators, private, voluntary and public sector workers and community members.

Accreditation

Participants will gain 6 NQF credit points at Level 4 by completing a workbook of tasks that are assessed against the set learning outcomes.

Related courses:

Self-harm and Adults, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training, Mental Health First Aid

SFA: Suicide First Aid: Understanding Suicide Intervention

SFAUSI Bold logo CG_Accreditation_Logo

17th  July 2019

1-day training solution teaching suicide intervention skills.  The course has been accredited by City & Guilds of London. Upon satisfactory completion participants attain 6 NQF credits at level 4.

The National Qualification in Suicide Prevention 2013-18

Course overview:

Teaching the theory and practice of suicide intervention skills that can be applied in any professional or personal setting, captured in a one-day event accredited by City and Guilds of London. We use only the most experienced suicide prevention trainers to deliver this unique learning experience: for anyone who seeks greater understanding and confidence to intervene with people at risk of suicide.

Course content:

SFAUSI is comprised of 4 parts, each approximately 90 minutes duration. The programme teaches and practices the skills and knowledge needed to identify someone who may be thinking about suicide and competently intervene to help create suicide-safety as a first aid approach.

Part 1 – 09:30 to 11:00

  • Introduction to: the day; programme; ourselves and suicide prevention
  • Stigma, Survivors of bereavement by suicide and the Hidden Toll
  • Suicide thoughts and suicide behaviour
  • Intention of behaviour Versus Outcome of behaviour
  • Possible Causes of Suicide thoughts

Part 2 – 11:15 to 12:45

  • Suicide – the Ripple Effect
  • Population-based approach to suicide prevention
  • Partnership working
  • Working with attitudes and values
  • “I’m so glad you told me” audio visual

Part 3 – 13:30 to 14:45

  • Meeting the needs of a person who is thinking about suicide
  • Suicide-Safety Guide
  • Step 1 – Recognising suicide and Asking about suicide
  • Step 2 – Understanding options

Part 4 – 15:00 to 16:30

  • Step 3 – Safeguarding suicide
  • Suicide-safety and self-care
  • The risk assessment approach
  • Suicide and suicide gestures
  • Future learning

Methods of delivery:

Taught over 6 hours using tutor facilitated Socratic learning, tutor-led role-play, mini lectures, group work and audiovisual presentations. This is a highly interactive and emotionally engaging learning experience.

Pre-training requirement:

No previous experience or training is necessary. Participants will be asked to self- reflect and empathise with a person having thoughts of suicide.

Who should attend?

Multi-sector practitioners including health, housing, social care, education, criminal justice, call centre operators, private, voluntary and public sector workers and community members.

Accreditation

Participants will gain 6 credit points at Level 4 by completing a workbook of tasks that are assessed against the set learning outcomes. This is the National Qualification in Suicide Prevention for the United Kingdom.

Related courses:

Self-harm and Adults, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training, Mental Health First Aid

SFA: Suicide First Aid: Understanding Suicide Intervention

SFAUSI Bold logo CG_Accreditation_Logo

11th September 2019 Buckinghamshire

1-day training solution teaching suicide intervention skills.  The course is a qualification programme recognised and awarded by City & Guilds Institute. Upon satisfactory completion participants attain 6 QCF credits at level 4 and the national qualification in suicide prevention.

Course overview:

Teaching the theory and practice of suicide intervention skills that can be applied in any professional or personal setting, captured in a one-day event recognised by City and Guilds of London. We use only the most experienced suicide prevention tutors  to deliver this unique learning experience: for anyone who seeks greater understanding and confidence to intervene with people who may be thinking of suicide.

Course content:

SFAUSI is comprised of 4 parts, each approximately 90 minutes duration. The programme teaches and practices the skills and knowledge needed to identify someone who may be thinking about suicide and competently intervene to help create suicide-safety as a first aid approach.

Part 1 – 09:30 to 11:00

  • Introduction to: the day; programme; ourselves and suicide prevention
  • Stigma, Survivors of bereavement by suicide and the Hidden Toll
  • Suicide – the Ripple Effect
  • Suicide thoughts and suicide behaviour
  • Intention of behaviour Versus Outcome of behaviour
  • Possible Causes of Suicide thoughts

Part 2 – 11:15 to 12:45

  • Population-based approach to suicide prevention
  • Partnership working
  • “I’m really glad you’ve told me” audio visual

Part 3 – 13:30 to 14:45

  • Meeting the needs of a person who is thinking about suicide
  • Suicide-Safety Guide
  • Step 1 – Recognising suicide and Asking about suicide
  • Step 2 – Understanding options

Part 4 – 15:00 to 16:30

  • Step 3 – Safeguarding suicide
  • Suicide-safety and self-care
  • Suicide and suicide gestures
  • Future learning

Methods of delivery:

Taught over 6 hours using tutor facilitated Socratic learning, tutor-led role-play, mini lectures, group work and audiovisual presentations. This is a highly interactive and emotionally engaging learning experience.

Pre-training requirement:

No previous experience or training is necessary. Participants will be asked to self- reflect and empathise with a person having thoughts of suicide.

Who should attend?

Multi-sector practitioners including health, housing, social care, education, criminal justice, call centre operators, private, voluntary and public sector workers and community members.

Accreditation

Participants will gain 6 QCF credit points at Level 4 by completing a workbook of tasks that are assessed against the set learning outcomes.

Related courses:

Self-harm and Adults, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training, Mental Health First Aid

SFA: Suicide First Aid: Understanding Suicide Intervention

SFAUSI Bold logo

9th August 2019 

Fully Booked

1-day training solution teaching suicide intervention skills.  The course is a qualification programme recognised and awarded by City & Guilds Institute. Upon satisfactory completion participants attain 6 credits at level 4, and the national qualification in suicide prevention.

Course overview:

Teaching the theory and practice of suicide intervention skills that can be applied in any professional or personal setting, captured in a one-day event. We use only the most experienced suicide prevention tutors to deliver this unique learning experience: for anyone who seeks greater understanding and confidence to intervene with people who may be thinking of suicide.

Course content:

SFAUSI is comprised of 4 parts, each approximately 90 minutes duration. The programme teaches and practices the skills and knowledge needed to identify someone who may be thinking about suicide and competently intervene to help coping and create suicide-safety as a first aid approach.

Part 1 – 09:30 to 11:00

  • Introduction to: the day; programme; ourselves and suicide prevention
  • Working with our beliefs about suicide
  • Stigma, Survivors of bereavement by suicide and the Hidden Toll
  • Suicide – the Ripple Effect
  • Suicide thoughts and suicide behaviour
  • Intention of behaviour Versus Outcome of behaviour
  • Possible Causes of Suicide thoughts

Part 2 – 11:15 to 12:45

  • Population-based approach to suicide prevention
  • Partnership working
  • “I’m Really Glad You Told Me” audio visual

Part 3 – 13:30 to 14:45

  • Meeting the needs of a person who is thinking about suicide
  • Suicide-Safety Guide
  • Step 1 – Recognising suicide and Asking about suicide
  • Step 2 – Understanding options

Part 4 – 15:00 to 16:30

  • Step 3 –Coping and Safeguarding suicide
  • Suicide-safety and self-care
  • Future safety
  • Future learning

Methods of delivery:

Taught over 6 hours using tutor facilitated Socratic learning, tutor-led role-play, mini lectures, group work and audiovisual presentations. This is a highly interactive and emotionally engaging learning experience.

Pre-training requirement:

No previous experience or training is necessary. Participants will be asked to self- reflect and empathise with a person having thoughts of suicide.

Who should attend?

Multi-sector practitioners including health, housing, social care, education, criminal justice, call centre operators, private, voluntary and public sector workers and community members.

Accreditation

Participants will gain 6 QCF credit points at Level 4 by completing a workbook of tasks that are assessed against the set learning outcomes.

Related courses:

Self-harm and Adults, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training, Mental Health First Aid

14 June 2016: What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?

 

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? Free article to download.

PTSD has existed as a diagnosis for around 35 years. At the time when it came into force – and still today – it has been controversial. For the first time, a mental health disorder was seen as being consequential to an event that happened to a person, and not because of some ‘flaw’ or deficit within that person’s biological or psychological make-up.

The symptoms of PTSD have been historically well documented before the diagnosis ever existed. Such examples include: ‘shell shock’, ‘traumatic neurosis’, ‘rape trauma syndrome’ and ‘car-crash syndrome’. Indeed, Samuel Pepys makes many references to nightmares, anxiety and avoidances in his diary regarding the 1666 Great Fire of London.

To read a recent medico-legal article on PTSD, please click here.

9 June 2016: How to cope with grief and loss

Grief can be about anything: the loss of a relationship, job, financial status, house or loss of a friend, a family member, a spouse. Grief can also be related to loss of youth, beauty, strength or independence. A perceived loss can cause grief. Grief can prove to be more difficult if we have previously experienced unresolved grief in our lives, which compounds our losses.

What are the different types of grief?  

Normal Grief (the five stages of grief) denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance (although not necessarily in this order), Unresolved Grief or Anticipatory Grief, Complicated Grief (absent, inhibited, delayed, conflicted, chronic, unanticipated and abbreviated).

How can we help the grief process?

What happens to your body and mind during grief? Why is it hard to sleep during grief? How do you help a person who has just lost someone? (Physical help) What NOT to do when supporting someone who is grieving? Why is talking/listening helpful for grieving person? (Mental/Emotional help, initially and then in coming months.)  What is the difference between depression and grief?

What are some helpful additional techniques for working through grief?

Use of symbols: Photos, videos, sharing thoughts about loved one. Writing: Write unspoken words to deceased. Write feelings/thoughts in journal. Drawing: Draw pictures of how you are feeling (good technique for children).

Cognitive restructuring: (With counsellor) Test irrational thoughts for accuracy.

Memory Book: Stories, events, memorabilia, to help integrate the loss.

Directed Imagery: When working with a counsellor, the client sits opposite the empty chair and visualizes the loved one with eyes closed, and says what they need to say (It is a very powerful technique to talk to the loved one and not just about them).

The Five Stages of Grief by Phoebe Hutchison (Based on the Kubler- Ross Model by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross & David Kessler)

Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression and Acceptance The stages of Grief have evolved since their introduction and they have been very misunderstood over the past three decades. They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss as there is no typical loss. Our grief is as individual as we are. The five stages, denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance are a part of the framework that makes up our learning to live with our loss. They are tools to help us frame and identify what we may be feeling. But they are not pit stops on a linear timeline in grief. Not everyone goes through all of them or in a prescribed order. Our hope is that with these stages comes the knowledge of grief’s terrain, making us better equipped to cope with life and loss. People often think of the stages of grief as lasting weeks or months. They forget that the stages are responses to feelings that can last for minutes or hours as we flip in and out of one and then another. We do not enter and leave each individual stage in a linear fashion as mentioned above. We may feel one, then another and back again to the first one.

Denial

This first stage of grieving helps us to survive the loss. In this stage, the world becomes meaningless and overwhelming. Life makes no sense. We are in a state of shock and denial. We go numb. We wonder how we can go on, if we can go on, why we should go on. We try to find a way to simply get through each day. Denial and shock help us to cope and make survival possible. Denial helps us to pace our feelings of grief. There is a grace in denial. It is nature’s way of letting in only as much as we can handle. As you accept the reality of the loss and start to ask yourself questions, you are knowingly beginning the healing process. You are becoming stronger, and the denial is beginning to fade. But as you proceed, all the feelings you were denying begin to surface.

Anger

 Anger is a necessary stage of the healing process. Be willing to feel your anger, even though it may seem endless. The more you truly feel it, the more it will begin to dissipate and the more you will heal. There are many other emotions under the anger and you will get to them in time, but anger is the emotion we are most used to managing. The truth is that anger has no limits. It can extend not only to your friends, the doctors, your family, yourself and your loved one who died, but also to God. You may ask, “Where is God in this?  Underneath anger is pain, your pain. It is natural to feel deserted and abandoned, but we live in a society that fears anger. Anger is strength and it can be an anchor; giving temporary structure to the nothingness of loss. At first grief may feel like being lost at sea: no connection to anything. Then you get angry at someone, maybe a person who didn’t attend the funeral, maybe a person who isn’t around, maybe a person who is different now that your loved one has died. Suddenly you have a structure – your anger toward them. The anger becomes a bridge over the open sea, a connection from you to them. It is something to hold onto; and a connection made from the strength of anger feels better than nothing. We usually know more about suppressing anger than feeling it. The anger is just another indication of the intensity of your love.

Bargaining

Before a loss, it seems like you will do anything if only your loved one would be spared. “Please God,” you bargain, “I will never be angry at my wife again if you’ll just let her live”. After a loss, bargaining may take the form of a temporary truce. “What if I devote the rest of my life to helping others? Then can I wake up and realize this has all been a bad dream?”

We become lost in a maze of “If only…” or “What if…” statements. We want life returned to what it was; we want our loved one restored. We want to go back in time; find the tumor sooner, recognise the illness more quickly, stop the accident from happening…if only, if only, if only. Guilt is often bargaining’s companion. The “if onlys” cause us to find fault in ourselves and what we “think” we could have done differently. We may even bargain with the pain. We will do anything not to feel the pain of this loss. We remain in the past, trying to negotiate our way out of the hurt.

Depression

After bargaining, our attention moves squarely into the present. Empty feelings present themselves, and grief enters our lives on a deeper level, deeper than we ever imagined. This depressive stage feels as though it will last forever. It’s important to understand that this depression is not a sign of mental illness. It is the appropriate response to a great loss. We withdraw from life, left in a fog of intense sadness, wondering, perhaps, if there is any point in going on alone. Why go on at all? Depression after a loss is too often seen as unnatural: a state to be fixed, something to snap out of. The first question to ask yourself is whether or not the situation you’re in is actually depressing. The loss of a loved one is a very depressing situation, and depression is a normal and appropriate response. To not experience depression after a loved one dies would be unusual. When a loss fully settles in your soul, the realization that your loved one didn’t get better this time and is not coming back is understandably depressing. If griefis a process of healing, then depression is one of the many necessary steps along the way.

Acceptance

Acceptance is often confused with the notion of being “all right” or “OK” with what has happened. This is not the case. Most people don’t ever feel OK or all right about the loss of a lovedone. This stage is about accepting the reality that our loved one is physicallygone and recognizing that this new reality is the permanent reality. We willnever like this reality or make it OK, but eventually we accept it. We learn tolive with it. It is the new norm with which we must learn to live. We must tryto live now in a world where our loved one is missing. In resisting this newnorm, at first many people want to maintain life as it was before a loved onedied. In time, through bits and pieces of acceptance, however, we see that wecannot maintain the past intact. It has been forever changed and we mustreadjust. We must learn to reorganize roles, re-assign them to others or takethem on ourselves. Finding acceptance may be just having more good days thanbad ones. As we begin to live again and enjoy our life, we often feel that indoing so, we are betraying our loved one. We can never replace what has beenlost, but we can make new connections, new meaningful relationships andinter-dependencies. Instead of denying our feelings, we listen to our needs; wemove, we change, we grow, we evolve. We may start to reach out to others andbecome involved in their lives. We invest in our friendships and in ourrelationship with ourselves. We begin to live again, but we cannot do so untilwe have given grief its time.Reference:

http://grief.com/the-five-stages-of-grief/

Ultimately, we need to incorporate a loss into our lives, taking the time to heal and remember, and eventually move forward on this journey of life!

May your love for yourself, your life and your children, deepen daily.

Phoebe Hutchison (Author/Counsellor)

 Dip. Prof. Couns. M.A.C.A.

 Maj. (Relationships & Conflict Resolution,

Childhood Development & Effective Parenting, Grief & Loss)

 

8 June 2016: New blood tests could herald the way forward for antidepressant medications

New blood tests could herald the way forward for antidepressant medications.

Yes, I’m a CBT therapist. But mostly, as taught to me at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College, London, I’m a pragmatic CBT Therapist.

What matters when helping people with depression, anxiety and so forth is to use every available tool that is to hand. Antidepressants; the newer SSRI-type antidepressants are an enormous leap forward compared to the older antidepressants that we use to rely upon. These SSRI-type antidepressants can be literally a lifeline for many.

The SSRI-type antidepressants work and when they work, they work well. Whilst they may not change the underlying cognitive or behavioural patterns that feed the depression, anxiety and so forth, they certainly alleviate the horrendous symptoms of being depressed or anxious.

BUT, and it is a massive but, they don’t work in approximately 50% of people, meaning that those people need different antidepressant medications (SNRI-type or Non-SSRI/SNRI-type).

Here lies a massive problem. It can take absolutely ages, through basic “trial and error” strategies (as that is all we have had so far!) to find the most effective one for that person. Anything that assists the prescriber in determining the correct antidepressant straight away is a god-send. People can get effective help quicker, without having to wait months before finding out that their antidepressant just doesn’t suit them.

There is a way forward. New ground-breaking published research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College, London, shows that patients who have blood inflammation above a certain threshold could be directed toward earlier access to more assertive antidepressant strategies, including the addition of other antidepressants or anti-inflammatory drugs.

Dr Cattaneo, first author on the research paper said: ‘This is the first time a blood test has been used to precisely predict, in two independent clinical groups of depressed patients, the response to a range of commonly prescribed antidepressants. ‘These results also confirm and extend the mounting evidence that high levels of inflammation induce a more severe form of depression, which is less likely to respond to common antidepressants.’ Dr Cattaneo added: ‘This study moves us a step closer to providing personalised antidepressant treatment at the earliest signs of depression.

For further information on this study, please click here.

Paper reference: Cattaneo, A et al (2016) Absolute measurements of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and interleukin-1-beta mRNA levels accurately predict treatment response in depressed patients The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology (IJNP)

Dr Paul Rogers – CBT in the heart of Cardiff

8 June 2016: New research shows the startling global prevalence of anxiety

New research shows the startling global prevalence of anxiety.

The nightmare of suffering from anxiety is often overlooked with considerably more attention being given to depression and mood concerns. However, anxiety and depression are often interlinked and co-occur.

New published research, led from researchers at the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Cambridge University has been published in the Journal of Brain and Behaviour. It highlights the startling worldwide prevalence of anxiety disorders capturing lots of media attention.

The research carefully examined 48 reviews on prevalence studies conducted across the globe; the first review to undertake such a comprehensive synthesis of the systematic reviews conducted to date on the prevalence of anxiety disorders. It provides a comprehensive, up-to-date summary of the state of knowledge in this area and concluded that “there was emerging and compelling evidence of substantial prevalence of anxiety disorders generally” (ranging from 4–25%). It found it was much higher: in women (5-9%); young adults (2.5–9%); people with chronic diseases (1–70%); and individuals from Euro/Anglo cultures (4-10%).

 

December 2014: Suicide-Safer London and Suicide-Safer Trinidad and Tobago – breakfast TV

We spent 2 weeks building suicide-safer communities with multi agency professionals, as partners with CREDI, Catholic Religious Educational Development Institute. So proud to launch our Internationally Accredited Suicide Prevention Programme in Port of Spain, December 2014.

We are working together to build a Suicide-Safer West Indies / Caribbean. Our working week commenced with 20 minutes on breakfast TV, Morning Brew, which was a conduit for key messages to the communities of Trinidad about how to respond and access help if one was at risk from suicide.